reading recap: february 2017

I had a busy February. We saw three awesome concerts (Periphery, Joe Satriani, and Guns N’ Roses), went to the Singapore Botanic Gardens, tried more new restaurants, saw some good movies (Lego BatmanMoonlight), and I read a lot. I think I might have hit a new personal record for number of books read in one month (especially the short month of the year!).

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Difficult Women — This collection of stories was captivating, tumultuous, distressing, and real. Gay’s writing is almost poetic and cuts deep. She presents women who are complex, emotional, damaged, and who persevered through tragedies. I loved it—read it in two days.  **favorite**

You Can’t Touch My Hair — I wish Phoebe Robinson was my friend. And she gets her wish for Michelle Obama to be her friend. Basically I wish Phoebe and Michelle and I were all friends. I loved how Phoebe uses unfiltered humor to tell stories from her life while discussing how they relate to race, gender, pop culture, and more. My favorite part might be the letters to her young niece at the end.  **favorite**

Another Day in the Death of America — Gary Younge picked a random day and examined the short lives of ten children and teenagers who were killed by guns on that day in the US. It puts each victim and their death in context of economic and familial situations, education, race, etc. It’s a powerful book in line with Matthew Desmond’s Evicted. My only quibble is that the author said this book is not about gun control, and while it’s true that he doesn’t delve into the politics of gun control, a book about ten children murdered by guns can’t entirely not be about that.

Freedom is a Constant Struggle — This is a very thought-provoking collection, if repetitive and in need of another round of edits. I’m not sure it’s the best one to start with if you’re unfamiliar with Davis. The email interviews weren’t engaging at all. I did appreciate Davis’s articulation in connecting struggles throughout the world, from the US to Palestine to Turkey to Africa. She’s a brilliant scholar-activist to whom we should pay heed, especially in these times. Her take on remaining optimistic and mass movements through community organizing uplifted me.

Blood at the Root — This is the true history of how more than 1,000 black citizens were driven out of Forsyth County, Georgia, starting in 1912 when three black men were accused of murdering a white woman. It’s a fascinating, horrifying, difficult read but important that we learn the truths of our country and not the sugar-coated, edited versions. I think I would have gotten more out of this one reading on paper instead of listening on audio. Still, the events of Blood at the Root especially sting in that we still experience this sort of racial cleansing today, be it “white flight,” gentrification, disproportionate incarceration rates, etc.

Wishful Drinking — I was standing in line for a concert while I read this short, irreverent book by the late, hilarious Carrie Fisher. It was a great book to cleanse my palate after three heavy, serious reads. Carrie rambled and went off on tangents at times, and I guess I was expecting more depth as far as her addictions went. I bet this is 100 times better on audio, but it worked pretty well as an ebook on my phone.

Fever Dream — I did like the unsettling sense of dread throughout this brief, creepy novel, but overall I feel neutral. This was an audio hold that came through, so maybe it was the wrong time for me for this one. Truthfully, I may need to read it again, and on paper instead of audio. (Or maybe not. I have a ton of other books to get to!)

Sleeping Giants — I started Sleeping Giants with my husband but he lost interest about halfway through. The premise is intriguing, if not the most original ever. Too many of the characters left a bad taste in my mouth (the actors gave them condescending, snotty attitudes) for me to continue with the series.

Beasts of No Nation — I saw the Netflix film a few months ago and thought it was astounding. I was looking for a book to fill the “author your age” square for the Litsy Reading Challenge, and Uzodinma Iweala is just one month older than I am, but I would have been interested in reading this regardless. Nyambi Nyambi did a phenomenal job performing the young protagonist Agu on the audiobook. Even though Beasts is a fiction, nothing about this story is “fake” in the sense that this is the harrowing, scary reality for many boys in war-torn countries of seemingly endless conflict.  **favorite**

Fire Shut Up in My Bones — My friend Anthony and I decided to resurrect our little two-person book club (now international!) and chose Fire Shut Up in My Bones. I loved Charles Blow’s introspective, descriptive, and poetic writing. He really gives you an immersive picture of the world in which he grew up. He’s an impressive figure who overcame a childhood fraught with poverty, betrayals, and inner turmoil. I had a couple of expectations going in that weren’t met, which is actually totally fine… it’s hard to talk about this without spoilers. I think I was just mislead (likely by my own self) in what may or may not have happened to him to shape his life journey. Anyway, it’s a fantastic memoir.  **favorite**

OKAY! This is a long post; maybe I should go back to singular review posts?? How was your February for reading?

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reading recap: january 2017

I think I’m getting my stride back with reading now in 2017. I’m not participating in any creative reading challenges this year, just the Goodreads and 50 Book Pledge ones, which takes some (admittedly imaginary) pressure off. So far I set my goal at 50, but I’m hoping to get back up to around 60, closer to my normal yearly amount. Bad bookish news, though: my Kansas City Public Library account expired! I was hoping I had at least another six months, tears. I’ve been using it for ebooks and audiobooks through Overdrive, and it’s been great. I’ll get a new account at my local Wisconsin library on my next visit back, but still. I liked having one last connection to Kansas City. Sigh.

I had a good January for reading, and enjoyed all of these books:

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  • Born a Crime (ebook) … Trevor Noah
  • Packing for Mars … Mary Roach
  • Metallica: Back to the Front … Matt Taylor
  • The Handmaid’s Tale (audiobook) … Margaret Atwood, read by Claire Danes
  • March, books 1–3 … John Lewis with Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

Almost all non-fiction… one could make the joke that I read all non-fiction… (weeps). But The Handmaid’s Tale was my favorite book of the month. I read it once before, in early 2010, and loved it then. I’ve had a little celebrity crush on Claire Danes for years and years—she was my spirit animal in My So-Called Life—and hearing her read one of my all-time favorite books gave me life in this state of political unrest. Just a terrifying, disquieting book. I read once that Atwood based things in the book (women losing agency over their finances, property, eventually their own bodies) on real-life events throughout world history. I wanted to start it over again from the beginning right after finishing (and I just may listen to it again before the year is out).

I was so excited to also read Born a Crime by Trevor Noah, an immigrant, when it came through my (last) library holds at the beginning of the year. It was a wonderful, sharp, insightful memoir to start of 2017. There were some utterly hilarious scenes, and I really admired his honesty about his relationships with his country and family, especially his mother. I loved his reflections on language and how that can effect interpersonal understanding and empathy. I only wish I had been able to listen to the audio version!

I’ve enjoyed a couple other Mary Roach books, and Packing for Mars was no exception. My husband got it as a Christmas gift a couple of years ago and recommended it to me this month. I realize now that it was another pertinent read for these times, with anti-science and anti-education mindsets becoming more rampant. RESIST!! But truly, Packing for Mars is signature Roach, making you feel as though you’re right alongside her as she investigates the “everything-you-want-to-know-but-are-too-embarrassed-to-ask” questions surrounding any given topic. Bonus: after I finished Nick and I visited the NASA: A Human Adventure exhibit currently on at the ArtScience Museum here in Singapore. It was a treat to see artifacts of the very things I’d just read about in person, including the space toilet!

The March graphic novel trilogy by John Lewis had been on my TBR for at least a few months now, but skyrocketed to the top thanks to events that took place on Twitter, you all know what I’m talking about. I snagged the only set at the Kinokuniya bookstore and devoured all three books in a matter of days. I usually struggle with graphic novels just in that I focus on the words so much I forget to take time absorbing the art too, but I made an effort to pay attention to both text and image and the experience really paid off. March is a very engaging work that clearly connects events and people through the civil rights movement of the 1960s via John Lewis’s involvement. I really hope young people are reading this right now.

Finally, for some much needed mental catharsis, I read through Metallica: Back to the Front, the authorized story of the Master of Puppets album and subsequent tour, as prep for the band’s concert here in Singapore on January 22. I listened to (almost) the whole discography as I read, which really enhanced the experience. This book is obviously a must-own for any die-hard fan, but I think even casual fans and listeners would really appreciate this round-table style recounting and images of the band starting up, the making of its first three albums, and the epic (and ultimately tragic) tour of 1986. Besides the history, this is a beautiful tribute to the band’s unforgettable late bassist Cliff Burton.

Looking ahead, I’d like to read Duff McKagan’s It’s So Easy and Other Lies before we see Guns N’ Roses on February 25 here, When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi, Freedom is a Constant Struggle by Angela Davis, Blood at the Root by Patrick Phillips, You Can’t Touch My Hair by Phoebe Robinson, and Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood. I’m already almost finished with Roxane Gay’s Difficult Women, which I simply haven’t been able to put down. We’ll see what I can get through!
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best albums of 2016

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This was another challenging year in many ways, but one indisputably good thing that happened was my renewed love of vinyl in late 2015. My husband and I discovered a new favorite store in Kansas City, Mills Record Company, where we quickly became regulars. I had my mother’s early-1970s Dual 1019 turntable in my bedroom through my teen years and I just loved it. I didn’t bring it to the dorms, of course, and didn’t think it would be smart or feasible to move it to any of my apartments. But last year I decided to hell with that, and I finally got my turntable set up in Kansas City. I’m sad it was so short lived—we had to bring it and all our records back to my folks’ house when we moved to Singapore. But this experience got me into listening again, really listening, and falling back in love with discovering new music. Here are my top 10 favorite albums released in 2016, in alphabetical order by artist:
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• Lemonade … Beyoncé
My #1 anyway. A bold, experimental, aware, and emotionally raw masterpiece. I had this on repeat for weeks after I first got it. I’m still in awe of this album, its unabashed statements on race, women, society, culture, and more. The whole thing is just stunning and important on multiple levels.

• Are You Serious … Andrew Bird
My favorite since his debut, The Mysterious Production of Eggs. Less pretentious, more personal than most of his catalog. I loved seeing him perform live in Kansas City (April 21, The Midland).

• Blackstar … David Bowie
Dark, strange, haunting, bleak, brutal. It took me a few listens to fully appreciate this avant-garde art-pop album, with each track more unexpected than than the last. A beautiful magnum opus from a legend.

• Changes … Charles Bradley
There’s something warm and familiar about Bradley’s sound, no matter what he’s singing. The pain he emotes on Black Sabbath’s “Changes” twists your heart.

• You’re Dreaming … The Cactus Blossoms
A timeless alt-country sound by Minneapolis brothers. Their songs are clean, simple, and refined. Those harmonies! Sigh. They put on a great concert at Knuckleheads in Kansas City (June 11).

• Black America Again … Common
My favorite since Be. I love Common’s poetic, socially conscious way of commenting on the political landscape today, as well as themes of love, and social justice. It reminds me of Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On in a lot of ways. I still get goosebumps when I hear “Letter to the Free.”

• Hardwired… To Self-Destruct … Metallica
It’s long, but this album is a fun composite of what people have loved about Metallica for the past 35 years. It’s not the “old” Metallica, but Hardwired feels like Metallica refreshed.

• A Sailor’s Guide to Earth … Sturgill Simpson
An ambitious country album with soul, psychedelia, southern rock, and more, Sailor’s Guide breaks free of any one genre label. It’s striking and memorable not only for that reason, but its intimacy and authenticity, too.

• Emily’s D+Evolution … Esperanza Spalding
This album blew me away the first time I heard it. Spalding blends jazz, folk, funk, and rock into this ambiguous style that’s wholly all her own. She’s been one of my favorite artists for a long time, and Emily’s is a prime display of her creativity and originality.

• The Suffers … The Suffers
This feel-good old-school R&B-meets-ska debut album is damn irresistible. Kam Franklin’s voice is one of the best and most soulful I’ve heard in years. There’s a lot of infectious joy on here. I can’t wait to hear more from this band.

Honorable Mentions:
The Last Hero … Alter Bridge
A Seat at the Table … Solange
Weezer (The White Album) … Weezer
Victorious … Wolfmother

There are a few albums I wanted to listen to in 2016, but haven’t had a chance yet: A Tribe Called Quest’s We Got it From Here… Thank You 4 Your Service, Bonnie Raitt’s Dig in Deep, Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker, Kendrick Lamar’s untitled unmastered., Angel Olsen’s My Woman, Nick Cave and the Bad Seed’s Skeleton Tree, Iggy Pop’s Post Pop Depression, and Frank Ocean’s Blonde. I’ll get to them!

I only have a vague inkling of what’s on tap for new releases in 2017, but the ones I’d be interested in hearing are those from Ani Difranco, The Roots, Justin Timberlake, Tool, Nine Inch Nails, St Vincent, Jay Z, and Zack de la Rocha (and more than that, I’m sure, once I know about them!). I hope I can hold on to this drive to discover new music, even without my turntable here in Singapore. For now I’m just getting excited to see Metallica perform here next weekend, and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam right after that (playing Debussy and Bruckner 4), Then, in February, we’ll go to the Periphery and Guns N’ Roses (with Wolfmother) concerts!

best reads of 2016

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This year was a whirlwind for me. I honestly can’t believe that I finished the year having read 45 books, with an international move taking up a lot of time and energy most of the year. I originally set my reading goal to 60 books but lowered it to 45, and just ended up making that a week or so before the end of the year. I’m disappointed I lost the motivation to write posts for each and every book I read, which left with being so busy and preoccupied with the move. I was glad to get back to doing monthly recaps at least, which may be how it goes for the foreseeable future. Or not! I’m still deciding. I would actually love to catch up on each book individually on the blog here, but I’m not sure I have it in me to sit at the computer very much for blogging. I admittedly did enjoy letting go of the pressure to post, but I miss having the archive of my thoughts.

Here are the top ten books I read in 2016, in alphabetical order by author’s last name:

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• Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl
+++… Carrie Brownstein (2015)
• We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
+++… Jeff Chang (2016)
• Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
+++… Matthew Desmond (2016)
• League of Denial
+++… Mark Fainaru-Wada, Steve Fainaru (2013)
• The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic
+++… Jessica Hopper (2015)
• I’m Just a Person
+++… Tig Notaro (2016)
• Station Eleven
+++… Emily St. John Mandel (2014)
• One of Us: Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway
+++… Åsne Seierstad (2015)
• Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove
+++… Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson and Ben Greenman (2013)
• The Fire This Time: A New Generation Talk About Race
+++… Jesmyn Ward, ed. (2016)

Honorable Mentions:
No god but God … Reza Aslan (2005)
Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman … Lindy West (2016)
Dead Mountain … Donnie Eichar (2013)
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee … Dee Brown (1970)
The Underground Girls of Kabul … Jenny Nordberg (2014)
The Argonauts … Maggie Nelson (2015)
Notorious RBG … Irin Carmon and Shana Knishnik (2015)
My Life on the Road … Gloria Steinem (2015)

761-1Only ONE fiction! Everything else (in both top ten and honorable mentions) are non-fiction books. There was some good fiction I read, but most of it just didn’t stick out to me this year much. To see my Goodreads “Year in Books” analysis, click here. But I kept my own stats which may be a little more accurate. By my count I ended up with:

• 45 books read total
• 7,598 pages read
• 170.93 hours of audiobooks
• 42.2% paper books, 42.2% audiobooks, 15.6% ebooks
• 57.8% non-fiction, 42.2% fiction
• 57.8% library borrows, 42.2% own books read
• 2010: average publishing year of books read
• 3.75 books read per month

I did track author genders, nationalities, and race… but I’m not sure it serves me and my reading much to share it here. I still feel sort of squicky about tracking those, although I am compelled to continue to keep an eye on them so I can make sure I’m continually seeking out books by authors of color, women, LGBTQ+, and authors from many parts of the world. All I know is I want to expand my worldview, learn, and empathize through books—I always have, but especially now more than ever.

reading recap: december 2016

Happy new year! I hope 2017 will be better in many ways and on many levels than 2016, and I’m going to do my part here in Singapore any way I can. December was hard; being away from my family during the holidays for basically the first time ever. But it was also weird since my routine is basically non-existent and the weather is perpetually summery, so it doesn’t exactly feel like “winter” and “holidays” here to me so much.

I managed to get a little bit of reading done last month. Here are my books for December:

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  • Tilting Our Plates to Catch the Light … Cyril Wong
  • Phenomenal Woman (ebook) … Maya Angelou
  • We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation … Jeff Chang
  • A Life in Parts (audio) … Bryan Cranston, read by author
  • Children of the New World: Stories … Alexander Weinstein
  • I’m Thinking of Ending Things (ebook) … Iain Reid

Except for the Cranston memoir, everything was on the short side: essays, short stories, poetry. I liked all these, not a bad one in the bunch, but probably my favorite reads for the month were We Gon’ Be Alright by Jeff Chang and I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid. The essays in We Gon’ Be Alright include deeper looks at Ferguson, racism in higher education, the morphed definition of “diversity,” #OscarsSoWhite, growing up Asian American, Beyoncé’s Lemonade, current segregation in K-12 education, and much more. It was short, timely, and I can’t recommend it enough.

I’m Thinking of Ending Things, also very short, took a little bit to get into and was slightly plain at first, but piqued my curiosity more with every chapter that I couldn’t put it down by the end and had to read the last few pages twice. This one was a library ebook I put on hold back in October for Halloween and it finally came though!

Children of the New World was overall very good, with only a couple of sleepers in the collection. I loved the premise of the through-line—an imagined near-future where technology is even more prevalent in the daily lives of humans. The stories that stood out to me in particular were “Heartland,” “Children of the New World,” “Rocket Night,” and “Ice Age.”

Bryan Cranston’s new memoir, A Life in Parts, was another library hold come through. It was fantastic on audio, hearing the actor himself talk about his many personal and professional experiences, including his most famous roles as Hal (Malcolm in the Middle) and Walter White (Breaking Bad). Nothing too deep or earth-shattering, but a solid celebrity memoir. I was inspired to re-watch Breaking Bad after reading this one!

I’m not normally a poetry person, but I ended up reading two more collections to close out 2016! Tilting Our Plates to Catch the Light was written by a local Singaporean poet, and I picked it up as a Christmas gift for my mom, but ended up reading it first before I mailed it home. It’s a beautiful collection about love, with additional themes of time, death, and distance. Phenomenal Woman is, of course, by the indomitable Maya Angelou. I’ve read this before, it’s only four poem, but I felt after what happened in November, it was time for a revisit. “Still, I Rise” is an all-time favorite.

My “best of 2016” posts are coming soon!
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reading recap: november 2016

Well… that happened. You know what I’m talking about. I think based on the books I read and love you can probably guess my political views. It has been surreal watching it all unfold from here in Singapore. Just surreal and frustrating and infuriating. Someone here recently asked me how I was doing after the election, and being crappy at hiding my feelings, I responded, “Oh, boiling over with rage.” “Still?” YES STILL, ALWAYS. Anyway. Needless to say, the election results didn’t exactly change my TBR entirely, as I have consistently been interested in learning more about social movements and justice, race, religion, history, politics, and culture. But the result certainly bumped certain books to the top of my list, and I did look up more books to add to the list. The result also stalled my book reading for about a week. I’m back into it though. Reading, educating myself, practicing empathy and understanding, and listening (and donating, writing emails, and signing petitions) are what I can do from abroad.

Here are my books for November:

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  • Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (audio) … Matthew Desmond
  • milk and honey (ebook) … Rupi Kaur
  • Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman (ebook) … Lindy West
  • No god but God (audio) … Reza Aslan
  • Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove … Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson

I gave up participating in Non-Fiction November… sort of. Now looking at my list, I realize I read all non fiction except one. All these books were fabulous except for the the one fiction.

My favorites were Evicted and Mo’ Meta BluesEvicted and also No god but God are absolutely essential reads right now. Evicted follows several families in the Milwaukee area, trapped in the vicious cycle of poverty exacerbated by addiction, disability, unemployment, and more impossibly cruel circumstances. It is extremely well written—intimate portraits of these very real people and their very real problems. Desmond humanizes an epidemic and makes clear that welfare and housing assistance reforms are necessary immediately.

Mo’ Meta Blues was just a delight—Questlove is just a charming, humble, thoughtful human being. I’ve loved the Roots for a long time so this has been on my list since it came out in 2013. In his memoir, Questlove keeps it light while going deep at the same time, which is a real feat. Important moments in his own personal and Roots’ histories are referenced with cultural progression in the U.S., and his philosophical musings about the states of pop culture, hip-hop, and music criticism were intelligent and spot on. I wish I had kept a list going of all the songs and records he mentions in order to listen to them all later. I loved it.

No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam is an accessible and informative book—Aslan brings to life the intricate, sprawling history of Islam and expands on its current varieties as well as how the religion has existed and relates in the world, including in the U.S. in the twenty-first century. This was an illuminating and fascinating book for me, especially right now.

Shrill was so much fun! I went from laughing out loud to feeling enraged to uplifted and empowered, often all in the same chapter. West didn’t come off as shrill at all to me, she’s insightful and self-aware of her own self and society. An excellent feminist read, I loved it—read it all in two days. Milk and honey was just okay. It started strong, but lost me halfway through. Only a few poems were truly striking, but many I breezed right over. Some were trite and some lacked originality—I know I’ve heard or read a few of the lines before in some of these poems. I was pretty disappointed in this poetry collection, it’s been sadly over-hyped in my opinion.

Here’s hoping for a better month to close out the year…
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