reading recap: may 2017

I read 13 books in May! Even though several were short and several were on audio, this might be a personal record for me. I also already hit 50 books (currently sitting at 51)! I can’t believe it. I guess this is what happens when you listen to audiobooks all day while you draw.

  • The Hearts of Men (audio) … Nickolas Butler, read by Adam Verner
  • Frankenstein (audio) … Mary Shelley, read by various
  • The Leavers (audio) … Lisa Ko, read by Emily Woo Zeller
  • The Road to Jonestown (audio) … Jeff Guinn, read by George Newbern
  • What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky (ebook) … Lesley Nneka Arimah
  • There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé (ebook) … Morgan Parker
  • The Teacher Wars … Dana Goldstein
  • Men Without Women: Stories (audio) … Haruki Murakami, read by various
  • Life’s Work (audio) … Dr. Willie Parker, read by Caz Harleaux
  • The Radium Girls (audio) … Kate Moore, read by Angela Brazil
  • Drinking: A Love Story (ebook) … Caroline Knapp
  • Parable of the Sower (ebook) … Octavia E. Butler
  • Bitch Planet, Book One … Kelly Sue DeConnick with Valentine De Landro

My favorites for the month, as usual, were the non-fictions: The Road to JonestownThe Teacher WarsLife’s WorkThe Radium Girls, and Drinking: A Love Story. I was fascinated by Jonestown and Radium, while Teacher Wars and Life’s Work are important pieces to understanding where we are on the topics of education and abortion today. Drinking was personal and raw, and made me think more deeply about my own use and relationship with alcohol.

Of the fictions, The Hearts of Men and What It Means When A Man Falls from the Sky really stand out to me, as well as a few stories from Men Without WomenParable of the Sower and Bitch Planet were recent picks for my international book club with my friend Anthony, and it was so great to read these along with him.

This last month I made a detailed plan for catching up on book posts here. I want to write a little bit about everything and I WILL get to it all! I’m traveling for several weeks in June and July, so I’m not sure how many posts I can write up and schedule ahead, but I’ll try my best to keep this space active a bit while I’m away.

I’m currently listening to Going Clear on audio, the exposé on Scientology that came out a few years ago, and it’s riveting so far. I also recently purchased Van Gogh’s Ear and Pachinko, which I’ve had my eye on for weeks! I also would like to pick up Chris Haye’s A Colony in a Nation and Roxane Gay’s new one, Hunger, while I’m on the road this summer. What are you planning for summer reading?
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reading recap: april 2017

It’s May! Officially a quarter through the year and I’m on a reading roll. In April, I read eleven books, although almost all were experienced on audio:

  • Deviant (audio) … Harold Schechter, read by R. C. Bray
  • Tears We Cannot Stop (audio) … Michael Eric Dyson, read by author
  • The Hate U Give (audio) … Angie Thomas, read by Bahni Turpin
  • White Tears (audio) … Hari Kunzru, read by various
  • On Tyranny (ebook) … Timothy Snyder
  • The Stand (audio) … Stephen King, complete/uncut, read by Grover Gardner
  • Sorry to Disrupt the Peace (audio) … Patty Yumi Cottrell, read by Nancy Wu
  • Exit West … Mohsin Hamid
  • American War (audio) … Omar El Akkad, read by Dion Graham
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns (audio) … Khaled Hosseini, read by Atossa Leoni
  • The Lathe of Heaven (audio) … Ursula K. Le Guin, read by Susan O’Malley

I didn’t mean to end up with so many audiobooks, especially since I have a ton of paper books I want to get through. But I’m really into The 100 Day Project, which started April 4. It’s a 100-day-long challenge to be creative every day. I chose my pencil drawing as my project, not to create a new piece every day necessarily but to get myself into committing myself to spending time drawing. I’ll write a more in-depth post about the experience soon, but basically I’ve been listening to audiobooks while I spend all this time drawing!

Besides the drawing, getting back into my blogging here is another new goal. I miss thinking more deeply about what I’m reading, and I want to keep up my writing skills. I have a lot to catch up on as far as book posts, and I’m planning writing about concerts, CDs, food, and more too!

I was a terrible Dewey’s 24-Hour Readthon participant! I have a hard time starting at 8 p.m. on a Saturday night. I only read 10 pages of Parable of the Sower, and I did finish The Lathe of Heaven on audio while I was drawing. Then my husband wanted to take a walk which, here in Singapore, can end up taking a couple-two-three hours. We walked to a gourmet ice cream shop 2 miles from our apartment, and half the way back before hopping a bus. I love how close everything can be here but the heat can be a lot to handle if you’re outside for too long. The ice cream was worth it though 😉

As for the best in April, though, I sincerely hope that everyone reads Tears We Cannot Stop and On Tyranny—super important for these times we’re having in the United States. If I could, I’d buy everyone I know a copy of these two books. Best of the month for me. All these books were good! It may take me a while, but I’m looking forward to doing individual posts on all of them.

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reading recap: march 2017

I had another prolific month of reading! It’s really nice to be back in a groove after so many blah months. I’m trying to catch up on books I’ve had forever and not buy new ones, and I’m doing okay with that, better than in the past. My audiobook reading has skyrocketed, though. Without a regular 8-to-5 I have tons of time to listen at home and on bus/subway rides. These ten books makes my 2017 total 27 already—more than halfway to my Goodreads goal of 50 for the year, so I may raise that soon enough!

  • Americanah … Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • The Stranger in the Woods (audio) … Michael Finkel, read by Mark Bramhall
  • When Breath Becomes Air … Paul Kalanithi
  • The Last One (win) … Alexandra Oliva
  • Psycho (audio) … Robert Bloch, read by Paul Michael Garcia
  • Brown Girl Dreaming (audio) … Jacqueline Woodson, read by author
  • Get in Trouble: Stories … Kelly Link
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (audio) … Ken Kesey, read by Tom Parker
  • Hidden Figures (ebook) … Margot Lee Shetterly
  • Mom & Me & Mom (audio) … Maya Angelou, read by author

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s NestWhen Breath Becomes Air, and The Stranger in the Woods were my favorites read in March. I loved Americanah, but I finished right before Adichie’s controversial interview comments came out, so I’m still sort of reconciling my feelings about it in retrospect. There were some really great stories in Get in Trouble, too, and Psycho was fabulous. I really wanted Hidden Figures to live up to all the grand hype, but for me it fell flat. The parts about the women themselves and their lives were excellent, but you have to wade through lots of textbook-like technical chapters that bored me. I still want to see the movie, though.

Okay. I think if I’m going to be getting through this volume of books (or close to it) each month, I’m going to have to get back into individual posts. It’ll be good for me, another project to keep me occupied!

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the beautiful bureaucrat

I couldn’t resist checking out The Beautiful Bureaucrat by Helen Phillips after seeing it all over the book blogs, despite the mixed reviews. Edited from Goodreads:

In a windowless building in a remote part of town, the newly employed Josephine inputs an endless string of numbers into something known only as “The Database.” After a long period of joblessness, she’s not inclined to question her fortune, but as the days inch by and the files stack up, Josephine feels increasingly anxious in her surroundings. When one evening her husband Joseph disappears, her creeping unease shifts decidedly to dread. As other strange events build to a crescendo, the haunting truth about Josephine’s work begins to take shape in her mind, even as something powerful is gathering its own form within her. She realizes she must penetrate an institution whose tentacles seem to extend to every corner of the city and beyond.

I feel like I’m in the middle on this one. It wasn’t as crazy and out there as I was expecting, and not quite as good overall as I was hoping. But I did like it enough to finish it (very short anyway, only about 170 pages) and I was left thinking afterwards. There seemed to be quite a few religious themes, or more like subtle undertones. For most of the story, Phillips takes the reader along on a compelling mental thriller, set in a familiar yet slightly dystopian future. The money struggles and futile, mindless job toiling will be recognizable to many in today’s economic climate… but it is quirky with enough twists and turns to make it interesting and not boring.

I wish the characters had been more fleshed out (they were described with one major physical attribute—bad breath, pink outfit, etc.) and the anagram wordplay was so annoying (“Gonna yin. Nag inn yo.” like that) that I started skipping over those parts. The end wasn’t executed as well as all that lead up to it; it was rushed, conveniently tied up. I feel like The Beautiful Bureaucrat could have either been shorter or longer than it was. Despite these minor quibbles, it was a real page turner right up until the end.

Read from September 5 to 6, 2015.

in the house upon the dirt between the lake and the woods

After seeing it reviewed by Rory at Fourth Street Review, In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods by Matt Bell has been on my radar. A few weeks ago, it became available on audio through my library. From Goodreads:

In this epic, mythical debut novel, a newly-wed couple escapes the busy confusion of their homeland for a distant and almost-uninhabited lakeshore. They plan to live there simply, to fish the lake, to trap the nearby woods, and build a house upon the dirt between where they can raise a family. But as their every pregnancy fails, the child-obsessed husband begins to rage at this new world: the song-spun objects somehow created by his wife’s beautiful singing voice, the giant and sentient bear that rules the beasts of the woods, the second moon weighing down the fabric of their starless sky, and the labyrinth of memory dug into the earth beneath their house.

This is a tough book to review! I was very intrigued by the darkness of the premise, and though I felt like giving up a few times I’m glad I ultimately stuck it out. In the House has so many converging elements, including magical realism, horror, folklore… even some action and mystery thrown in. “Mythical” is just about the perfect word to describe it overall, too. The breakdown of the couple’s marriage is painful, the husband’s descent into fury is kind of frightening, even. It just made me think, how far is this man going to go? Is this even about having children anymore? It was really thought-provoking. Charlie Thurston narrated this audio version, and I had to set it to 1.5x speed—normal was just a little lethargic for me! But the clip of his voice at 1.5x made the poetic nature of the prose much more theatrical.

I don’t think In the House is for everyone—ratings on Goodreads are starkly divided. Once I let go of things making sense and just went with the dreamy quality of the story I enjoyed it a lot more.

I’m counting In the House as book two of five for the KC Library’s Love on the Rocks Adult Winter Reading Program.

Listened to audiobook from January 13 to February 5, 2015.

audiobook mini-reviews: shovel, ocean

In addition to the three short books I read on paper and electronically, I listened to a couple of audiobooks on the road last week and on my rehearsal commutes this week, rounding out my reading for 2014:

I picked Shovel Ready by Adam Sternbergh for our drive to Wisconsin partly because it was fairly short, and also because it seemed like a plot that both Nick and I would enjoy. While not the greatest example of post-apocalyptic literature I’ve encountered, Shovel Ready was still a fun, action-packed read that was perfect for our time in the car. The book follows Spademan, a garbageman-turned-hitman in a New York City that was decimated by a surprise dirty bomb in Times Square. The wealthy can hook themselves up to a virtual world (a la Ready Player One) while everyone else ekes by out on the chaotic, dangerous streets. Spademan is hired to kill the daughter of a famous evangelist, and thus begins the tumultuous, mysterious adventure in Shovel Ready. [Listened to audiobook from December 19 to 26, 2014.]

I just finished The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman today, another audiobook I chose for its brevity and the story sounded pretty interesting. This is the first Gaiman work I’ve read. Generally I enjoyed Ocean, though I’m not sure I was compelled enough to seek out more Gaiman. It leaned just a bit too YA and fantasy for my tastes. In Ocean, an unnamed middle-aged man returns to his hometown for a funeral, and ends up stopping by the street on which he grew up and visiting the home of a wise-beyond-her-years, apparently magical girl named Lettie Hempstock, with whom he was friends. At her house, he speaks with one of Lettie’s family members and long-forgotten events start coming to light again. Ocean straddles several genres, with elements of fantasy, horror, adventure, and mystery, ultimately boiling down to a battle between good and evil and the dissociation existing between childhood and adulthood. I have to say it was a treat to listen to Gaiman himself narrate this audio version! I think his reading made it a better experience than paper would have been for me in this case. [Listened to audiobook from December 27 to 31, 2014.]