notorious rbg

It’s March 15 and it’s Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s birthday! What better day to write my post on Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik? From Goodreads:

You can’t spell truth without Ruth.
Only Ruth Bader Ginsburg can judge me.
The Ruth will set you free.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg never asked for fame—she was just trying to make the world a little better and a little freer. But along the way, the feminist pioneer’s searing dissents and steely strength have inspired millions. Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, created by the young lawyer who began the Internet sensation and an award-winning journalist, takes you behind the myth for an intimate, irreverent look at the justice’s life and work. As America struggles with the unfinished business of gender equality and civil rights, Ginsburg stays fierce. And if you don’t know, now you know.

Already I can tell this will be one of my favorite books of the year. I honestly didn’t know many details about RBG or her history, and Notorious RBG was an excellent primer. Her work on the Supreme Court has definitely been important and progressive, but learning more about her perseverance throughout her professional career as a woman, wife, and mother made her even more inspiring to me. I’m just in awe of her knowledge, dry wit, and tenacity. And the woman does TWENTY push-ups every day! Despite being a book born from the Internet (Tumblr, in this case), Notorious RBG is balanced well between personal life, professional accomplishments, and some playful, fun sections, too. I appreciated how the authors made the dissents and other legal items totally accessible.

This was an entertaining, informative, and unconventional biography. I was thrilled to see the news this week that a new book of her writings will be released early next year! But I can’t recommend Notorious RGB highly enough. The woman is a true American feminist hero.

Read from February 19 to 29, 2016.

just mercy

If you’ve been reading my blog lately, you know I’ve been itching for some great non-fiction and Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson was an incredible book that hit me right in the feels, as they say. I do have a fascination with learning about the American prison system and crime, so this was right up my alley. From Goodreads:

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

What a powerful memoir. Throughout the book, Stevenson recounts his youth and education, and also outlines the many issues with the current prison industrial complex, but the most powerful segments revolve around how his work effects him and his clients on personal and emotional levels. Chapters range from infuriating to hopeful, and ultimately I wanted to start this over right away after I finished it. Listening to Stevenson narrate added to the urgency and poignancy of the events in this book.

At the heart of this book is Walter McMillian’s case, who was sent to Death Row before he even had a trial. The obstacles Stevenson and his team faced to use the proof Walter was innocent were just enraging. It’s a piercing example of how Jim Crow still has a tight grip on our legal system, reiterating how racial oppression, poverty, and also mental illness are exploited to drive the highly profitable mass incarceration in this country.

Just Mercy was in line with two books I read earlier this year and found equally important and heartbreaking: The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace (my review) and Men We Reaped (my review). To go further, a couple more books I’m interested in reading now on this topic are Ghettoside and The New Jim CrowJust Mercy is an eye-opening account of a growing problem in the U.S. from the inside, and Stevenson’s dedication and compassion is truly inspiring. Can’t recommend this highly enough.

Listened to audiobook from June 4 to 18, 2015.