it’s monday! what are you reading?

It’s Monday, what are you reading? I am on a roll with the women authors this year. I finished two fantastic books, The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson (audio) and The First Collection of Criticism by a Female Rock Critic by Jessica Hopper, this week. Just excellent books, the first on gender and family and the second on music—reviews coming this week. Yesterday I started My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem, which I won in a Goodreads giveaway back in October. I’m sorry to say I haven’t gotten around to it until now because it’s great, I’m already a quarter through!

Last week I enjoyed my usual St. Patrick’s Day celebrations with Irish music and Irish food—shepherd’s pie (with ground lamb), soda bread, and this year (new) I made Guinness stout chocolate-chocolate chip cookies with Bailey’s buttercream frosting and sparkly green sprinkles. The recipe I went by yielded more than double what I was expecting so we have a ton leftover!! I also didn’t get around to making colcannon, even though I have the ingredients, and I picked up bangers at the Local Pig on Thursday with the ground lamb, so I guess I’ll be extending my St. Patrick’s celebrating into next week as well. We watched Brooklyn and Boondock Saints too.

I downloaded a couple of audiobooks for a Wisconsin trip next weekend: Get In Trouble by Kelly Link and The Underground Girls of Kabul by Jenny Nordberg.

What are you reading this week?

our souls at night

Over Labor Day weekend, I decided to have a mini-readathon with the three short books that all happened to come through at the library for me at the same time. First up was Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf. From Goodreads:

In the familiar setting of Holt, Colorado, home to all of Kent Haruf’s inimitable fiction, Addie Moore pays an unexpected visit to a neighbor, Louis Waters. Her husband died years ago, as did his wife, and in such a small town they naturally have known of each other for decades; in fact, Addie was quite fond of Louis’s wife. His daughter lives hours away in Colorado Springs, her son even farther away in Grand Junction, and Addie and Louis have long been living alone in houses now empty of family, the nights so terribly lonely, especially with no one to talk with.

A lot of other reviews use the words “bittersweet” and “sad” to describe this book, and I definitely agree. Haruf does an amazing job of bringing out the feelings of loneliness, and our innate need for intimacy and companionship. The prose is spare and simple, but beautifully constructed. It was a perfect little book (only about 170 pages) for a readathon, and a touching story about not giving up on your future and really living, no matter your age. Their conversations were heartbreaking sometimes, but their bravery in starting a new chapter at their age was inspiring.

I think though, I had trouble with how quickly Addie and Louis’s relationship moved—just didn’t find it all that believable. I also struggled with the behaviors and attitudes of their adult children… if you read it you’ll see what I mean.

Our Souls at Night was worth reading for me, though, but probably because it was so short. This was my first and only Haruf read, and I’m not sure it affected me so much to want to read more of his books. Maybe you need to be an established fan to appreciate this one more than I did. I also think I’m riding a non-fiction wave right now and fiction just isn’t doing it for me in general at the moment.

Read from September 4 to 5, 2015.

an untamed state

After reading Bad Feminist and seeing this one all over “best of” lists last year, I knew I had to read Roxane Gay’s An Untamed State. From Goodreads:

Mireille Duval Jameson is living a fairy tale. The strong-willed youngest daughter of one of Haiti’s richest sons, she has an adoring husband, a precocious infant son, by all appearances a perfect life. The fairy tale ends one day when Mireille is kidnapped in broad daylight by a gang of heavily armed men, in front of her father’s Port-au-Prince estate. Held captive by a man who calls himself The Commander, Mireille waits for her father to pay her ransom. As it becomes clear her father intends to resist the kidnappers, Mireille must endure the torments of a man who resents everything she represents.

What a powerful, harrowing book. The brutal violence during Miri’s captivity took my breath away—it reads like a bona fide thriller. Scenes flashing back to Miri’s childhood and marriage are interspersed throughout the first part, letting the reader get to know all the players better and Miri’s mindset before her 13-day ordeal began. (That’s one shining light for the reader—you know she will be freed after 13 days. Miri does not, though.) The second half of the book covers the aftermath of the event—Miri’s fragile, volatile mental and emotional health as a result of the physical and psychological trauma she endured. Not only Miri suffers during and after her kidnapping, her family does as well. They all have to reconcile with what happened to her and find a “new normal” somehow.

I do believe An Untamed State lives up to the hype—it makes a mighty impression and is not a story you’ll soon forget. However, for me personally, I found the characters to be generally unlikable. I don’t need all my protagonists in entertainment to be likable, I just got the impression we’re supposed to like Miri and her husband. They’re supposed to be great star-crossed soulmates or something, but their overall mutual unkindness to each other and immaturity was unappealing to me. I think I would have liked more insight into the socioeconomic, political, and cultural context within this story—Miri’s privilege over her captors and Haitians living in abject poverty is mentioned but not discussed in depth.

An Untamed State delves deep into the very real issue of rape and violence against women that are rampant in societies all over the world. I don’t think I’ve ever read anything so thoughtfully bold on the subject. The sheer terror and fear Miri felt, both during and after her kidnapping, were palpable. Gay doesn’t hold back on the shocking sexual and physical atrocities committed on Miri, which may be more than some readers can stomach, but sticking through the whole book is worth it.

Read from August 7 to 23, 2015.

it’s tuesday! what are you reading?

It’s Tuesday, what are you reading?—a weekly blog meme hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

Yes, it’s Tuesday! I kept feeling like yesterday was Tuesday, and today was Wednesday. I must just be excited about going to the Royals game tomorrow 🙂 Anyway, yesterday I shared my Bout of Books 14 wrap-up post. I would have liked to accomplish more but at least I was able to finish one book and participate in some challenges and half a Twitter chat.

So yes, last week I finished An Untamed State by Roxane Gay. I was really hooked but it wasn’t quite the earth-shaking, life-changing stunner I was expecting (stupid hype!!). Still, it was really, really good and will probably rank up there with one of the best books I read this year. Review coming soon!

I was going to start City on Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg… I have an ARC and since it’s being released in October (and it’s 900-some pages) I thought I better get going on it. I fully admit to being intimidated by the page count and hesitant to dive in because of that. But, my husband asked me to read Stephen King’s The Long Walk before he leaves next week for a month-long residency in Washington (state) so we can talk about it—he read it earlier this year and I love it when he wants to “book club” with me!

What are you reading this week?

madison audiobooks

My husband and I just got back from six wonderful days in Wisconsin, visiting family and having a ton of fun! Of course I forgot my camera, so there are no pictures. We listened to two audiobooks on the road, one new to me and one I read on paper last year. Both of these were absolutely perfect for the car.

On the way up we heard The Daily Show crew read America: The Audiobook. Sigh, I miss Jon Stewart already. Although America is slightly out of date now (released in 2004), it was still a fun and funny look at our political history. I loved how it was a group effort, with not only Stewart narrating but also Stephen Colbert, Ed Helms, Samantha Bee, and more. The only bummer was that it was abridged, which I generally try to avoid, but I didn’t feel like I was missing anything here. [Listened to audiobook on August 11, 2015.]

During our drive home we listened to Rob Delaney’s Mother. Wife. Sister. Human. Warrior. Falcon. Yardstick. Turban. Cabbage. I loved it as much as I loved it last year when I read it on hardcover (my review), but I enjoyed it even more hearing Delaney narrate. He’s just the best! I hope to have a chance to watch his new show Catastrophe soon, too. [Listened to audiobook on August 16, 2015.]

it’s monday! what are you reading?

It’s Monday, what are you reading?—a weekly blog meme hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

It’s Monday once again, and I’m (once again) heading up to Wisconsin this week! This time it’s to celebrate the birthdays of my mom and my little niece (her first). I’m hoping to get to Devil’s Lake, Vitense putt putt, a beer at Weary Traveler, Jazz at Five, Cash Box Kings at the Terrace, and a bunch of other fun south-central Wisconsin stuff I haven’t had a chance to do in years. Should be a great trip!

DSC04243I’ve downloaded a couple of audiobooks (Mother. Wife. Sister. … by Rob DelaneyAmerica (The Book) by Jon Stewart (miss you already)) for the drive, but I was a little befuddled by what to read on paper next. I did start The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan, but I’m not sure I want to bring that out of town (library book). So to round out that non-fiction, I chose to start An Untamed State by Roxane Gay as well over the weekend. So far I’m completely hooked… I’ll bring it along up north but figure I likely won’t have much time to read it!

What are you reading this week?