favorite reads of 2017

I had a hard year. It’s strange to be here on the other side of the world away from my loved ones, especially during such a volatile time in my country’s history. I felt helpless, lonely, and frustrated a lot in 2017. Books and music, as always, provided much comfort, as well as entertaining and educating me.

I read 97 books total in 2017. Ninety-seven! I can’t believe that; doesn’t seem real. Is it weird that even though I wildly exceeded my goal and read more than ever before in a single year, I’m a little mad I didn’t hit 100?? I’m a competitive person. A lot of them were in the form of audiobooks listened to while I was spending hours drawing. Reading on paper is still my favorite method, though, and I want to get back to reading more of my physical books in the new year.

• 97 books read total
• 9,599 pages read
• 407 hours (approx.) of audiobooks (that’s 17 days!)
• 27.8% paper books, 58.8% audiobooks, 11.3% ebooks, 2.1% paper/audio
• 61.9% non-fiction, 38.1% fiction
• 64.9% library borrows, 32% own books read, 2.1% audible free trial, 2% borrow
• 2007: average publishing year of books read
• 2017: publishing year of most books read (38 of 97)
• 8 books read per month average

I did track author gender (identifying as), POC or not, and whether they were from the United States or not. I ended up about half-and-half on gender and POC/white, but disproportionately more American writers than other nationalities. I’d like to read even more books by women, writers of color, and non-Americans in 2018… although I admit I usually just go with what looks good and interesting to me first and foremost before taking these other items into account. But I’m glad I started tracking this to be more aware of my reading choices and to diversify it further.

Here are my favorite books I read in 2017, separated by non-fiction and fiction, in alphabetical order by author’s last name (links go to my individual posts):

The New Jim Crow … Michelle Alexander (2010)
What Happened … Hillary Clinton (2017)
Hunger … Roxane Gay (2017)
Janesville: An American Story (audio) … Amy Goldstein (2017)
Killers of the Flower Moon (audio) … David Grann (2017)
When Breath Becomes Air … Paul Kalanithi (2016)
• The Glass Castle … Jeannette Walls (2005)
• They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us … Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib (2017)

What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky (ebook) … Lesley Nneka Arimah
The Heart’s Invisible Furies (audio) … John Boyne
The Hearts of Men (audio) … Nickolas Butler
Bitch Planet, Vol. 2: President Bitch … DeConnick / De Landro
Difficult Women … Roxane Gay
Made for Love (audio) … Alissa Nutting
Borne … Jeff VanderMeer
Sing, Unburied, Sing … Jesmyn Ward
**all fiction here published in 2017

Honorable Mentions from 2017 (alpha by author’s last name):
The Teacher Wars … Dana Goldstein (2014)
The Road to Jonestown (audio) … Jeff Guinn (2017)
A Colony in a Nation … Chris Hayes (2017)
A Thousand Splendid Suns (audio) … Khaled Hosseini (2007)
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (audio) … Ken Kesey (1962)
The New Odyssey (audio) … Patrick Kingsley (2017)
The Lathe of Heaven (audio) … Ursula K. Le Guin (1971)
The Radium Girls (audio) … Kate Moore (2017)
The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer … Siddhartha Mukherjee (2010)
Born a Crime (ebook) … Trevor Noah
ZeroZeroZero (audio) … Roberto Saviano (2013)

 

tbr pile challenge 2018

I’m excited to join the 2018 TBR Pile Challenge next year! Host Adam of Roof Beam Reader is reviving the challenge after a two-year hiatus. I tried it in 2013, 2014, and 2015 and hilariously failed each time. I went on a bit of a book-buying bender in 2016, so this will (hopefully) be the perfect project for me in 2018.

The rules are pretty simple, just read 12 books that have been on your TBR for more than a year within the 2018 calendar year. So that means no books published on or after January 1, 2017 are eligible. You can have two alternates in case something from your main list is a DNF for you.

As I finish the books I’ll write a review post here on the blog, and then check them off and add the review post links on my master list page under the Book Challenges tab in the menu here.

Before the Fall … Noah Hawley (2016)
Buried in the Sky … Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan (2012)
Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation … Michael Pollan (2013)
Dark Money … Jane Mayer (2016)
Dead Wake … Erik Larson (2015)
Homegoing … Yaa Gyasi (2016)
The Mothers … Britt Bennett (2016)
No Country … Kalyan Ray (2014)
Sugarbread … Balli Kaur Jaswal (2016)
The Summer that Melted Everything … Tiffany McDaniel (2016)
White Line Fever … Lemmy Kilmister with Janiss Garza (2002)
The Wonder … Emma Donoghue (2016)

Alternates
Pushout … Monique Morris (2016)
Snowing in Bali … Kathryn Bonella (2012)

the iceman

As you know if you read me here, I’m fascinated by American mafia culture. Right now, I’m working on a drawing of Paulie and Chrissy from The Sopranos. I thought Anthony Bruno’s The Iceman would be a perfect companion to listen to while I work, and it was! From Goodreads:

At home, Richard Kuklinski was a dedicated suburban family man; on the street, he was the Iceman, a professional hit man and lethal scam artist, a man so heartless he kept one of his victims frozen for over two years to disguise the time of death. His personal body count was over one hundred, but the police couldn’t touch him. Then undercover agent Dominick Polifrone posed as a mobster and began a deadly game of cat and mouse. The Iceman chronicles Kuklinski’s grisly career and exposes his murderous double life.

Kuklinski had a terrible, abusive childhood, the violence of which obviously followed him into adulthood. This book doesn’t cover it (and I’m no doctor), but he must have had some sort of untreated mental illness, too, from the descriptions of his wild mood swings; his wife said she never knew when he’d fly into a random fit of rage. I found it interesting that Kuklinski wasn’t like other mob guys you hear about—he was not a womanizer, he didn’t dabble in drugs or gambling. His killings were gruesome and horrifying, and the sheer impassivity he displayed regarding his actions and taking another human life is chilling.

The Iceman definitely scratched my perpetual true-crime itch for the time being. I thought about reading Philip Carlo’s book on Kuklinski, also titled The Ice Man but after his lackluster writing in The Butcher, I think I’ll just stay with Bruno’s book. This was a fast-paced, engaging read, even if at times towards the end some information was repeated. I think I have seen the 2012 film starring Michael Shannon (I’d have to see it again…) and now I definitely want to watch The Iceman Tapes documentary, where Kuklinski himself is interviewed on film.

Listened to audiobook in October 2017.

mini-reviews: bailed! lincoln, spaceman, game of thrones

I thought talking about a few books I DNF’d would be a fun change! Here are three books I bailed on in the last year.

I got about an hour into the audiobook version of Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders before ditching it. Yeah, not for me. I borrowed this one from the library to see what the hype was about and I couldn’t get into it. I think with Lincoln, there are so many characters, so many different voices, living and dead, and it doesn’t read like narrative fiction—it’s almost like a play—that it was way too confusing on audio. I’ve heard that Lincoln is better on paper, but I don’t think I’m going to try a different format, though. I wasn’t crazy about Saunders’s Tenth of December either, though I did finish that one (wasn’t bad, just, again, not for me). And of course, now Lincoln has won the Booker Prize! The cheese stands alone, I guess. [Bailed in March 2017.]

I got halfway through Jaroslav Kalfař’s Spaceman of Bohemia. I really tried—I had this as a borrow from the library on ebook! I’m the worst at reading ebooks! I was really disappointed to quit because I thought this was extremely interesting premise: Czech orphan grows up to be his country’s first astronaut, is assigned a dangerous mission to Venus, upon which he encounters a strange and mysterious giant spider with human features on his ship. Is this spider real; is it an alien? Or is it his imagination? Jakub’s personal history and relationships, as well Czech political history, dominate this book. I guess I was expecting more of an adventure story than philosophical novel about myriad topics… none of which were a giant, possibly imaginary space spider. Sadly, reading this just started feeling like a chore. [Bailed in April 2017.]

Sigh, A Game of Thrones. I love the show and I’m all caught up on it there. George R. R. Martin‘s masterpiece series is SO hyped and SO revered. I thought I’d give it a shot between seasons of the show. Again, I had this on ebook from the library and I really gave it a chance. 177 pages into this first book and I was bored to tears. The writing is just godawful, pure shit. Am I alone here? Maybe this will be my unpopular opinion of the month! [Bailed in December 2016.]

dewey’s 24-hour readathon: april 2017

Dewey’s 24-Hour Readathon returns this weekend! After years of not participating due to work, gigs, or travel, I have the free time now to join in this year. Okay technically this is not my first Dewey’s Readathon; I did join the October 2016 one, but that was a last-minute decision and I didn’t have any sort of plan. This time… is still sort of a last-minute decision. Oops! I don’t know why these things always sneak up on me. But I’m excited anyway and hope to be a more proactive participant this time.

I’ve picked out four books to work on, with few expectations for what I actually accomplish. I’d like to keep this readathon as chill as possible:

My main focus will be on The Teacher Wars, which I actually would love to finish this weekend, or at least get a nice significant chunk read. Parable of the Sower is the recent pick for my “international book club” (just me and a buddy of mine back in Kansas City, we read the same book and have a Skype date to discuss), and What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky came in on ebook through my library holds just this morning. The Lathe of Heaven was a recommendation from another KC friend, and it’s a short audiobook so I thought it would be perfect as my next listen while I continue working on my current drawing.

The readathon’s 24 hours starts at the same time across the globe, which means 8 p.m. Saturday night for me here in Singapore. That means I’ll end up really getting into it when I wake up tomorrow morning, around hours 11–12, realistically doing only about half of the readathon in earnest. I made one post on Instagram, and this one here on my blog, but I’ll likely use Twitter as my main vehicle for participation. I’ll include my final readathon thoughts and accomplishments in my April recap post!

best reads of 2016

bestof2016logo

This year was a whirlwind for me. I honestly can’t believe that I finished the year having read 45 books, with an international move taking up a lot of time and energy most of the year. I originally set my reading goal to 60 books but lowered it to 45, and just ended up making that a week or so before the end of the year. I’m disappointed I lost the motivation to write posts for each and every book I read, which left with being so busy and preoccupied with the move. I was glad to get back to doing monthly recaps at least, which may be how it goes for the foreseeable future. Or not! I’m still deciding. I would actually love to catch up on each book individually on the blog here, but I’m not sure I have it in me to sit at the computer very much for blogging. I admittedly did enjoy letting go of the pressure to post, but I miss having the archive of my thoughts.

Here are the top ten books I read in 2016, in alphabetical order by author’s last name:

best-books-of-2016

• Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl
+++… Carrie Brownstein (2015)
• We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
+++… Jeff Chang (2016)
• Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
+++… Matthew Desmond (2016)
• League of Denial
+++… Mark Fainaru-Wada, Steve Fainaru (2013)
• The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic
+++… Jessica Hopper (2015)
• I’m Just a Person
+++… Tig Notaro (2016)
• Station Eleven
+++… Emily St. John Mandel (2014)
• One of Us: Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway
+++… Åsne Seierstad (2015)
• Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove
+++… Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson and Ben Greenman (2013)
• The Fire This Time: A New Generation Talk About Race
+++… Jesmyn Ward, ed. (2016)

Honorable Mentions:
No god but God … Reza Aslan (2005)
Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman … Lindy West (2016)
Dead Mountain … Donnie Eichar (2013)
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee … Dee Brown (1970)
The Underground Girls of Kabul … Jenny Nordberg (2014)
The Argonauts … Maggie Nelson (2015)
Notorious RBG … Irin Carmon and Shana Knishnik (2015)
My Life on the Road … Gloria Steinem (2015)

761-1Only ONE fiction! Everything else (in both top ten and honorable mentions) are non-fiction books. There was some good fiction I read, but most of it just didn’t stick out to me this year much. To see my Goodreads “Year in Books” analysis, click here. But I kept my own stats which may be a little more accurate. By my count I ended up with:

• 45 books read total
• 7,598 pages read
• 170.93 hours of audiobooks
• 42.2% paper books, 42.2% audiobooks, 15.6% ebooks
• 57.8% non-fiction, 42.2% fiction
• 57.8% library borrows, 42.2% own books read
• 2010: average publishing year of books read
• 3.75 books read per month average

I did track author genders, nationalities, and race… but I’m not sure it serves me and my reading much to share it here. I still feel sort of squicky about tracking those, although I am compelled to continue to keep an eye on them so I can make sure I’m continually seeking out books by authors of color, women, LGBTQ+, and authors from many parts of the world. All I know is I want to expand my worldview, learn, and empathize through books—I always have, but especially now more than ever.