american housewife

As you know, I’ve been in a funk the last month or so with my reading (and kind of everything…). I’ve been having the worst time focusing on books in any format, but I think maybe I’m starting to come out of it, partly thanks to American Housewife: Stories by Helen Ellis, a great recommendation from one of my friends back home. Edited from Goodreads:

Meet the women of American Housewife: they wear lipstick, pearls, and sunscreen, even when it’s cloudy. They casserole. They pinwheel. They pump the salad spinner like it’s a CPR dummy. And then they kill a party crasher, carefully stepping around the body to pull cookies out of the oven. These twelve irresistible stories take us from a haunted prewar Manhattan apartment building to the set of a rigged reality television show, from the unique initiation ritual of a book club to the getaway car of a pageant princess on the lam, from the gallery opening of a tinfoil artist to the fitting room of a legendary lingerie shop. Vicious, fresh, and nutty as a poisoned Goo Goo Cluster, American Housewife is an uproarious, pointed commentary on womanhood.

As a woman who happens to be married and also happens to just now not be working outside the home, I have to admit the beginnings of some of these stories hit me a little to close to home (“What I Do All Day,” for example—a list of the mundane things a former career woman rattles off after she relinquishes her office job to become a full-time author supported financially by her husband, only to lose her motivation and settle into a stereotypical housewife role… holy identity crisis (mine), Batman). Here in Singapore, I’ve been called a housewife and have gotten so offended! “NO, I’m a musician and artist.” I’ve learned since that there isn’t the stigma or historically negative association with being a non-working female spouse here like there is in the States (I still answer “no,” though). But just when I moved from slightly uncomfortable to cringing while listening to these stories, there’d be a wtf! moment that would turn the whole thing on its head and have me laughing. Well done! My favorite stories were:

  • “The Wainscoting War,” about a condo-hallway decorating conversation that, in the immortal words of Ron Burgundy, “escalated quickly”
  • “Dumpster Diving with the Stars,” a commentary on our ridiculous obsession with reality TV and celebrities
  • “Hello! Welcome to Book Club!” which emphasizes the cliquey-ness of book clubs and takes it to the extreme
  • “My Novel is Brought to You by the Good People at Tampax,” another “that escalated quickly” story, about a woman with a touch of writer’s block working on her first novel, which has been sponsored by Tampax
  • “Dead Doorman,” in which a bored housewife develops relationships with employees of her posh apartment building

There were a few list-like pieces that I found amusing too, like “How to Be a Grown-Ass Lady” and “How to Be a Patron of the Arts.” Ellis’s characters are devilish and wicked while her observations on the expectations of modern womanhood are sharp and sardonic. Overall I enjoyed the dark quirkiness to this collection; it’s a funny, entertaining quick read that was perfect to get me out of this slump.

Listened to audiobook in February 2018.