just mercy

If you’ve been reading my blog lately, you know I’ve been itching for some great non-fiction and Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson was an incredible book that hit me right in the feels, as they say. I do have a fascination with learning about the American prison system and crime, so this was right up my alley. From Goodreads:

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

What a powerful memoir. Throughout the book, Stevenson recounts his youth and education, and also outlines the many issues with the current prison industrial complex, but the most powerful segments revolve around how his work effects him and his clients on personal and emotional levels. Chapters range from infuriating to hopeful, and ultimately I wanted to start this over right away after I finished it. Listening to Stevenson narrate added to the urgency and poignancy of the events in this book.

At the heart of this book is Walter McMillian’s case, who was sent to Death Row before he even had a trial. The obstacles Stevenson and his team faced to use the proof Walter was innocent were just enraging. It’s a piercing example of how Jim Crow still has a tight grip on our legal system, reiterating how racial oppression, poverty, and also mental illness are exploited to drive the highly profitable mass incarceration in this country.

Just Mercy was in line with two books I read earlier this year and found equally important and heartbreaking: The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace (my review) and Men We Reaped (my review). To go further, a couple more books I’m interested in reading now on this topic are Ghettoside and The New Jim CrowJust Mercy is an eye-opening account of a growing problem in the U.S. from the inside, and Stevenson’s dedication and compassion is truly inspiring. Can’t recommend this highly enough.

Listened to audiobook from June 4 to 18, 2015.

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